Img 2211 masselin 3

Normandy, France: conventionally established crop on the left, Claydon-drilled crop on the right. Photo 13 January 2018 after weeks of rain.

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Same field in Normandy, close-up of conventional

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Same field in Normandy, close-up of Claydon

Une parcelle de ble apres colza semee au claydondrill 13 dec 17

Belgium, 13 December 2017. Wheat after oil seed rape, Claydon-drilled. Courtesy of https://green-farm.be/

Vs un semis de ble voisin sur labour - laquelle possede la meilleure capacite dinfiltration deau 13 dec 17

Belgium, a neighbouring field, same day, wheat drilled after ploughing. Courtesy of https://green-farm.be/

Une parcelle de ble apres colza semee au @claydondrill 2 13 dec 2017

Same field in Belgium, a close-up of Claydon-drilled. Courtesy of https://green-farm.be/

Vs un semis de ble voisin sur labour - laquelle possede la meilleure capacite dinfiltration deau 2 13 dec 17

Same field in Belgium, a close up of conventional establishment. Courtesy of https://green-farm.be/

Wet weather? No problem.

We are experiencing extreme weather conditions with increasing frequency - weeks following weeks of rain and more instances of torrential downpours.  

Despite this extreme weather, our customers are letting us know how well their Claydon-drilled fields are looking, particulary when you can see a comparison with neighbouring fields. 

How is this the case?

It's all down to the all-important Claydon patented front tine technology.

Soil structure remains intact, as the Claydon front tine loosens soil only in the seeding zone.  It decompacts and creates tilth for the seed to grow away strong.  It drains water away from the seed to prevent waterlogging and encourage healthy rooting.  Worm populations thrive and their burrows act as natural drains.  Previous crop decomposes, increasing soil organic matter and fertility, and again improving soil structure.  Soil erosion and water run-off decreases.

Wet weather? No problem.